Mentor Teacher & Principal Resources

Each component of our teacher prep programs is vital to our candidates’ professional effectiveness.  Without solid content knowledge, candidates will struggle teaching accurately.  Without solid pedagogical, theoretical and ‘methods’ knowledge, candidates will struggle designing instruction that is differentiated and responsive; in other words, they will struggle teaching well.  But, the rubber has to meet the road at some point.  It is important for candidates to have strong knowledge and to demonstrate skills with their peers within program course work, but at some point, candidates need to be able to stand in front of P-12 students, engaging them effectively in learning.  Field work, actually being with P-12 students, is a key point of integration.  We work in all of our programs to ensure that our candidates have diverse experiences, with diverse P-12 students, across their program.

Student Teaching is a specific form of focused field experience that brings all other course work and field experiences to bear as a student teacher works to instruct P-12 students in a holistic and ongoing basis.  Part-time student teaching (typically between 18-20 hours a week) begins to integrate the candidate into the P-12 classroom(s) s/he will eventually ‘take over’.  Full-time student teaching (typically between 40-50 hours a week) allows the candidate to have full-charge of the classroom (for a minimum of three full weeks), designing instruction, assessing students, monitoring the classroom, communicating with colleagues and parents, etc.  Both of these culminating field experiences take place under the mentoring eye of a certificated Mentor Teacher who serves as in Instructional Leader in the building and an NU Supervisor.  These mentors continually give formative and summative feedback to the candidate, helping her or him to develop their classroom knowledge, skills and approaches.  This experience (typically during the undergraduate candidates’ last semester and MIT candidates last two semesters) is an important time of preparation (can I actually teach, manage and engage P-12 students?) and evaluation (does this candidate have the aptitudes and knowledge to be an effective P-12 classroom teacher?); thus, during this period the candidate will receive continuous feedback and will be formally evaluated by their Mentor Teacher, Mentor Principal, as well as their NU Supervisor.  Several resources will be helpful to the Mentor Teacher and Mentor Principal.

Student Teaching Timelines

Undergraduate Candidates

Fall Semester Undergrad Student Teaching (graduating in December)

  • Part-time Student Teaching: Late August through mid-October (six weeks; 17-20 hours per week)
  • Full-time Student Teaching: mid-October through mid-December (nine weeks; 40-50 hours per week; at least three weeks ‘full-charge’ of the classroom)

Spring Semester Undergrad Student Teaching (graduating in May)

  • Part-time Student Teaching: mid-January through February (six weeks; 17-20 hours per week)
  • Full-time Student Teaching: March through early January (nine weeks; 40-50 hours per week; at least three weeks ‘full-charge’ of the classroom)

MIT Candidates

  • Methods Experience: mid-January through February (six weeks; 60 hours total)
  • Part-time Student Teaching: March through April (eight weeks; 17-20 hours per week)
  • Full-time Student Teaching: May through mid-June (six weeks; 40-50 hours per week; at least three weeks ‘full-charge’ of the classroom)

General Resources

Mentor Teacher Resources

Below you will find a list of helpful resources, including assessments such as the state-required pedagogy assessment (edTPA) and our own internal assessment (CPP).  All student teacher/program evaluations will be sent to you by your student teacher via an email link from their FolioTek electronic portfolio.  These are vital to their growth and to our program development.  We ask that you would respond promptly to those evaluation requests once they arrive.  In addition, we ask all Mentor Teachers to write a formal ‘Letter of Recommendation’ for their student teacher.  Please do so and mail a hardcopy directly to our COE office at: College of Education, Northwest University, P.O. Box 579, Kirkland, WA 98033.

Mentor Principal Resources

Below you will find a list of helpful resources, including assessments such as the state-required pedagogy assessment (edTPA) and our own internal assessment (CPP).  All student teacher/program evaluations will be sent to you by your student teacher via an email link from their FolioTek electronic portfolio.  These are vital to their growth and to our program development.  We ask that you would respond promptly to those evaluation requests once they arrive.  In addition, we ask all Mentor Principals to write a formal ‘Letter of Recommendation’ for their student teacher.  This means that we expect all Mentor Principals to observe our student teachers at least once (on multiple occasions is ideal) to offer feedback and to provide insights for that recommendation.  Please do so and mail a hard copy directly to our COE office at: College of Education, Northwest University, P.O. Box 579, Kirkland, WA 98033.  For clarity: the ‘Supervisor’ documents below apply to our own NU Supervisors who will observe student teachers in your building and, obviously, the Mentor Teacher is your own classroom teacher who is mentoring their student teacher.

Honorariums, Expectations & Forms

IRS Form W-9

We gladly provide honorariums to both Mentor Teachers and Mentor Principals once all evaluations and letters of recommendation have been submitted for their student teacher.  We are required to request that you complete the following form before we can issue your honorarium for mentoring our students. Please print the form, complete it, sign it, date it, and mail it to:
Northwest University
College of Education
P.O. Box 579
Kirkland, WA 98033

IRS Form W-9